Japanese Language and Culture

Causative Passive

Production Rules:

Rule Meaning
Infinitive (Plain Nonpast Indicative) Ichidan: [root] + させられる
[root] + saserareru
Godan: [あ-stem] + せられる
[a-stem] + serareru
X is made/will be made to [do] (by someone)

Note that this form is simply the result of conjugating the causative form into the passive.

Inflection Examples:

Infinitive (Plain Nonpast Indicative)
食べる
taberu (to eat)
食べさせられる
tabesaserareru
話す
hanasu (to speak)
話させられる
hanasaserareru
歩く
aruku (to walk)
歩かせられる
arukaserareru
泳ぐ
oyogu (to swim)
泳がせられる
oyogaserareru
呼ぶ
yobu (to call)
呼ばせられる
yobaserareru
飲む
nomu (to drink)
飲ませられる
nomaserareru
死ぬ
shinu (to die)
死なせられる
shinaserareru
作る
tsukuru (to make)
作らせられる
tsukuraserareru
待つ
matsu (to wait)
待たせられる
mataserareru
洗う
arau (to wash)
洗わせられる
arawaserareru

Irregulars:

Infinitive (Plain Nonpast Indicative)
する
suru
(to do)
させられる
saserareru
くる
kuru
(to come)
来させられる
kosaserareru

Usage Notes & Examples:

  1. Conjugating to the causative passive form results in the creation of a new ichidan verb (even if the starting verb was godan). This resulting verb can be conjugated to give negatives, past tenses, presumptives, provisionals, polite forms, etc., just as any other ichidan verb. Of course, you must be careful, as there are conjugations that wouldn't make logical sense for a verb in the causitive passive form.
  2. For ichidans there is a colloquial form whose rule is [root] + sasareru. For "taberu", this results in "tabesasareru". For godans there is a colloquial form whose rule is [a-stem] + sareru. For "nomu", this results in "nomasareru". Note that both these forms result from the contraction of "sera" into "sa".

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